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Resilience


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https://www.discovermagazine.com/environment/indigenous-people-are-deploying-drones-to-preserve-land-and-traditions

In Guyana, members of the Wapichan tribe ride motorbikes along bumpy forest roads, drones tucked safely inside their backpacks. They’re heading toward an illegal gold mining operation on the tribe’s land, where workers are clearing away the rainforest and allowing pollutants to run into the Wapichan’s water sources. The drone team will photograph the site from above, creating a mosaic of aerial photos that can be used to defend the tribe’s land in court. The Wapichan tribe built its own fixed-wing drone in 2014 to patrol its territory from above. Gregor MacLennan, a program director for the nonprofit organization Digital Democracy, and tribe members relied on YouTube videos and online forums to help assemble the drone. While MacLennan brought some tools and electronic components with him to Guyana, most of the drone’s body was improvised from materials in the village. In part, so the drone was repairable with whatever was on hand in the event of damage. The drone features a motor mount made of plastic cut from an old beer crate. Since then, the Wapichan program has acquired a few Parrot Bebop quadcopters. And the program has already shown some results: In 2015, a Wapichan drone team spotted an illegal logging operation on the Brazilian border, where settlers often encroach. They also found evidence that the Marudi Mountain gold mine was leaking pollution into Wapichan water sources.

United Nations (U.N.) program Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, or UN-REDD. https://www.un-redd.org/

https://www.un-redd.org/blog-1



https://pirate.care/pages/concept/

https://forensic-architecture.org/

‘Forensic architecture’ is the name of an emergent academic field we have developed at Goldsmiths. It refers to the production and presentation of architectural evidence—relating to buildings, urban environments—within legal and political processes.

http://www.freefairandalive.org/about/

Ambitious, sophisticated, and resolutely grounded in everyday realities, Free, Fair and Alive present a compelling vision of a future that can actually work. Written by two highly experienced commons activists, this book is at once a penetrating cultural critique, table-pounding political treatise, and practical playbook for building a new world of commoning. Jargon-free and full of colorful stories and diverse examples, this book will help readers recognize commoning as a vision that can help take us beyond the dead-end binaries of left-right, individual-collective, state-market, and Coke-Pepsi that has almost brought the world to its knees.


https://www.thejustdatalab.com/ --- reimagining data for justice

https://transparencytoolkit.org/

http://d4bl.org/programs.html

https://ad.watch/


https://farmhack.org/tools


--- THE CRITICAL ENGINEERING MANIFESTO ---[edit]

https://criticalengineering.org/



== AI indigenous Content/Resilience ==

http://www.indigenous-ai.net/people/ INDIGENOUS AI Indigenous Protocol and Artificial Intelligence Working Group The working group is interested the following questions:

From an Indigenous perspective, what should our relationship with A.I. be? How can Indigenous epistemologies and ontologies contribute to the global conversation regarding society and A.I.? How do we broaden discussions regarding the role of technology in society beyond the largely culturally homogeneous research labs and Silicon Valley startup culture? How do we imagine a future with A.I. that contributes to the flourishing of all humans and non-humans?

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